Tag Archives: AOTA

Turning Energy into Action: 6 Tips for Maintaining Momentum after an OT Conference

 

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I’ve been fortunate enough to attend AOTA’s Annual Conference for four years in a row now, and this year’s Centennial (#AOTA17) was my first year attending as an official OT practitioner! There were about 13,000 attendees in Philadelphia this year, and it was truly an amazing experience. I was able to present an AOTA-sponsored session with my Emerging Leaders mentor, deepen friendships with my Emerging Leader cohort, develop skills in my new practice area, and learn about cool things happening in the world of OT. I had a great time and I was sad to finally leave Philly, although I was SO ready to sleep in my own bed again! Still, in the week that I’ve been home, I’ve been making an effort to keep all of the OT energy from Conference going strong!

 

By this time all the Conference attendees have headed home and everybody has likely settled back into their daily grind. And while you may not be attending any fun educational sessions, dance parties, or networking events in the near future, there are several ways you can continue making the most of your conference experience even after you’ve returned home.

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Top 6 Reasons to Volunteer at the 2016 AOTA Annual Conference & Expo

 

Do you like…

Saving money?

Making friends?

Making a difference?

If so, then you should sign up to volunteer at the 2016 AOTA Annual Conference & Expo in Chicago, Illinois! I volunteered at the Baltimore conference a couple years ago for practically nothing, and it was easily one of the highlights of my early OT experience. I was also able to attend last year’s conference in Nashville, and the time I spent there just confirmed that I had chosen the perfect profession.

There were volunteers of all ages and stages at the conference, including retired OTs, veteran volunteers with 10+ years of experience, current and future OT students, and others. Don’t let your age, student status, or anything else deter you from serving in Chicago this spring! You don’t have to be an AOTA member to volunteer – but you’ll probably want to be one when you’re done!

In addition to helping support and promote one of the fastest-growing, influential, and dynamic professions around, there are several other benefits that come with being a conference volunteer. Read on to find out more about why volunteering will be the best thing you can do for yourself and your career in OT!

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  1. Meet some of the most influential people in the profession. As a conference volunteer, you have the chance to meet the people whose blogs you read, whose papers you’ve referenced, and whose Twitters you follow in person! Rubbing elbows with such accomplished (and really nice) people is a major high and a can’t-miss networking opportunity!
  2. Cut the cost of attending Conference. Conference attendees must pay nearly $300 simply to attend, and that’s the student rate – not including travel, food, lodging, and other expenses! But volunteers can view special exhibits, attend one or two sessions, and see the posters for FREE. As a volunteer, you won’t necessarily be able to attend the session of your choice or participate in all events, but you will get to experience many of the best parts of the conference without paying for much of anything! Pro Tip: Check with your OT program, graduate student association, or employer to see whether there are special funds available to help cover your travel and other expenses. 
  3. Attend the Expo for FREE! Where else in the world can you get a TON of free stuff in exchange for just a few hours of your time? Just think: in the time it took you to sit through one overly long OT school class, you could be having fun, making friends, and earning your way into the Expo. You don’t have to be a math whiz to see that this is too good a deal to pass up! Note: Only AOTA Marketplace/Member Resource Center volunteers can earn this privilege. 
  4. Diversify your resume and grow your professional experience. Volunteering at the national conference shows that you are involved and invested in your national professional association and your profession as a whole. Whether you are planning to apply for a leadership or volunteer position with AOTA, a position in your state OT association, or even a job, having a record of service to the profession will definitely give you a boost.
  5. Make a difference and be an advocate for OT. Have you ever wondered how all those bags get stuffed, how all those signs get posted, or how an event with thousands of attendees seems to run so smoothly? It’s not magic – it’s volunteers! By serving as a conference volunteer, you can be a part of the team that makes the AOTA Annual Conference such an amazing experience for attendees from across the U.S. and around the world and have a great time while you do it!
  6. Network with students and faculty members from OT programs across the country. While I served as a conference volunteer, I had the opportunity to talk with fellow OT students, meet instructors from numerous OT programs, and exchange ideas and information with a variety of people. Volunteering at conference is a great way to meet people who may have similar interests to yours, so be sure to keep those business cards handy!

…well, what are you waiting for? Visit the AOTA Volunteer Signup page today and find your place! (And click quickly, because spots fill up fast!)

See you in the Windy City!

 

Gift Guide for OT Students

The holiday season is approaching quickly, and many OT students will have friends and family members asking what’s on their wish lists. If you are a current OT student or new grad, share this list to help make holiday shopping easier for the ones you love! You might even see some things you’d like to purchase for yourself. I’m a big fan of the reference clipboard for building confidence (and knowledge) during fieldwork, customized badge clips, and the 2016 AOTA Conference registration!

Whether you decide to purchase an object or an experience, you can’t go wrong with these great gifts!

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Click through for links to individual items.
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Hill Day from Far Away – OT Advocacy at Home

As you might have heard, AOTA Hill Day 2015 is approaching quickly and OT/A students and practitioners from across the country will be headed to Washington, D.C. for a day of advocacy and action!

If you can’t get to the capital, there are still a ton of ways you can be involved in the action! I believe that legislative advocacy is an important part of professional development, because the way you practice is ultimately determined by state and federal laws and policies. OT/As are in the best position to bring issues to the forefront, especially because they are dealing with these issues in practice every day.

This interactive infographic includes links to websites and resources you can use to start planning for Hill Day even if you’re far away! However you decide to participate, be sure to share your ideas on Facebook and Twitter using #OTHillDay!

Click on the image to access the links!

Hill Day at Home

Resources

Check out these links for more info about how to prepare for Hill Day!

  • Part 1 and Part 2 of my Hill Day 2014 experiences
  • Tips on polishing up your OT elevator speech for meetings with representatives and political figures

OT Resources for Students & Professionals: An Interactive Infographic!

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Are you an OT student or practitioner looking to improve your practice, increase your success, and give back to the profession of occupational therapy?

If so, check out my new interactive OT Resources infographic! In it, you’ll find information about:

  • OT scholarships
  • Research and grant writing
  • Professional development opportunities
  • Getting involved with policy, legislation, and advocacy
  • Improving your practice skills
  • Student leadership opportunities
  • Evidence-based practice
  • Advanced certifications
  • Understanding OT’s scope of practice

…and much, much more! So click on the image or the Resources tab above and check it out, and please share with your peers, coworkers, and friends in OT!

Increasing Diversity in Occupational Therapy: The Coalition of Occupational Therapy Advocates for Diversity (COTAD)

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In case you weren’t aware, the profession of occupational therapy is many things – rewarding, exciting, and fast-growing, for example. However, diverse is generally something this profession is not – although efforts are being made to change this. According to AOTA, the profession looked like this in 2013-141:

Race and Ethnicity Percentage of Workforce
White, Hispanic & non-Hispanic 82%
Black, Hispanic & non-Hispanic 4%
Asian, Hispanic & non-Hispanic 6%
Native & Pacific Islanders, Hispanic & non-Hispanic <1%
Other- Hispanic & non-Hispanic 7%

The makeup of OT/A academic programs was similarly lacking in diversity2:

  • Programs offering doctoral degree level programs—88.6% Caucasian
  • Programs offering master’s degree level programs—72.8% Caucasian
  • Programs for OT assistants—74.6% Caucasian

In the AOTA’s Advisory Opinion on Cultural Competency and Ethical Practice, they state that “cultural competence is key to effective therapeutic interactions and outcomes,” and I vehemently agree. However, as of 2006, over 72% of students in OT and OTA programs and nearly 90% of students in OTD programs in the United States were Caucasian. These disappointing data (although they are outdated) indicate that students and professionals in our field may not represent a sufficiently broad range of experiences, perspectives and backgrounds that are vital for successful therapist-client relationships and meaningful professional development. Increased diversity within the profession means that occupational therapy will be improved for both clients and practitioners, and the addition of more socioculturally diverse professionals to the workforce will result in more effective and culturally appropriate client care as well as enriched professional exchanges.

So why does diversity matter? Continue reading

How to Get OT Observation Hours: 6 Things to Know Before You Shadow an OT

6 Things to Know Before You Observe an OT

So you’ve followed my advice in the first few steps of this post and successfully set up your OT observation experience – congratulations! Now you’re probably wondering what to do before your first day at the site.

I’ve compiled a list of the most important things you should be aware of before embarking on your shadowing experience. From the importance of being an informed observer to remembering to take note of particularly meaningful moments, I’ve covered several things I wish I had known before I started observing OTs!

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